Sculpty Hardening Tips!!
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Sculpty Hardening Tips!!

Posted in Custom Workstation

I think I'm going to make a tut out of this but I'm putting this up for now.

I had some extra sculpt after Morrigan and had no use for it I decided to experiment with it and my hair dryer. The first thing I did was set it on a metal sheet (Galvanized steel roof plating I got at Lowes awhile ago.) And then ran my dryer on it at the high setting. I kept at it for about a minute. I touched it and the sculpt turned to super mush and I thought it was ruined. Since the metal sheet and the sculpt was very hot I poured a little water from my drinking water on it to cool it down, and to my surprise the sculpt got to the rubbery state. I repeated the process over 5 times and after the fifth time the sculpt (when dried from the water on it) it was as hard as if it was sitting overnight.

You only need to set the sculpt on metal the first time to get it rubbery, but I suggest keeping it under whatever your trying to dry, this way it will resonate heat from under and over the subject.

I hope this helps anybody who needs to have sculpt drier faster. As always I suggest experimenting with this first. I used this process to on Morrigans hair and on a Junkion piece I'm putting on eBay and had very good results with both.

Posted by Shinobitron
on Saturday, March 17, 2007
User Comments
deadeye -
Friday, April 27, 2007
I find FIMO is better than standard sculpey in a lot of ways - and with its waxy pliant texture it sounds a lot like sculpey 3

I always set it on a long low heat for like an hour


I also use Miliput alot
Buzzy Fret -
Monday, April 23, 2007
I got some of the Apoxie Clay and Apoxie Solvent. The Apoxie Clay is less tacky was easier to manipulate and the Apoxie Solvent is definitely the key to smoothing and blending both the Sculpt and Clay plus it makes clean up a lot faster. The Solvent definitely helped on my flilling in job on my Punisher I'm working on.
Shinobitron -
Thursday, April 19, 2007
I used to use those guns when I helped my dad refinish some furniture. It mainly used for paint removal.
Henchmen4Hire -
Wednesday, April 18, 2007
Holy carp D: Is that the gun electricians use on wiring? Maybe it would melt the figure too
cowboyink -
Wednesday, April 18, 2007
at your local hardware shop you should be able to find a "heatgun" just a couple minutes and bam 1500 BTU of custumizing....but watch your hands
Buzzy Fret -
Friday, March 23, 2007
I'm not knocking the Fixit. Someone proficient at sculpting (unlike me) would probably do well with it just knowing about the tackiness beforehand. Obviously Jin and Kyle do very well with it and if you're experienced with the Apoxie Sculpt then you'd probably be able to use the Fixit very well.

I'm intrigued with the Apoxie Clay. I'm going to give Aves a call to see what they say about it's texture and tackiness and how it compares to the Sculpt and Fixit.
Henchmen4Hire -
Friday, March 23, 2007
My main problems with the apoxie stuff:

-It's sticky, even after leaving it for a while, it's still sticky, but water helps a little.

-It doesn't transfer as flawlessly onto a figure as Sculpey. In other words, I can tell where I used apoxie on a figure to add boot-cuffs or a collar. Sculpey transitions onto a figure flawlessly. But I guess the apoxie would work just as well once I get the hang of it.

-Apoxie "tears", I hate that! If you pull apart a piece of Sculpey, it just stretches like gum most of the time. If you stretch a piece of apoxie, it tears in half; It's not very flexible. Same problem when you try to smooth the apoxie onto a figure, little bits of it start coming off at the edges, VERY annoying. But maybe I can make it better with some water?
VariablePenguin -
Friday, March 23, 2007
that's disappointing. I guess I'll stick with getting the Sculpt like I usually do (not that I need any right now)
Buzzy Fret -
Friday, March 23, 2007
That's the same Fixit that I'm talking about. It will hold it's shape better than the Sculpt but it's tacky as hell right from the start.
VariablePenguin -
Friday, March 23, 2007
But there is a 3rd product called Fixit-Sculpt that doesn't need the setting time (according to Jin)
Buzzy Fret -
Friday, March 23, 2007
Both Apoxie Fixit and Sculpt - they are both ok to use right after mixing, it's just suggested by Jin and some other customizers to let it setup a little before using to reduce the tackiness. Fixit is extremely tacky and still very tacky even after an hour of sitting. Kyle told me that sometimes he will let his Fixit sit for 2 hours after mixing before he uses it.
VariablePenguin -
Friday, March 23, 2007
Apoxie Sculpt and Fixit need about 30-45 minutes to get less tacky, but Fixit Sculpt (which is like the best of both together) aparently needs not setting time. It is supposed to be good to go right after mixing and dry harder than Apoxie Sculpt.
Gee_jays_Customs -
Friday, March 23, 2007
prolly a softer I guess?

~Gj
Buzzy Fret -
Friday, March 23, 2007
Hey did you guys know about this?



I wonder if it's closer to Sculpey in texture and consistency?
Buzzy Fret -
Friday, March 23, 2007
Super Sculpey looks like this:

Sculpey III looks like this:

I will probably try working with some of this stuff to get better at sculpting.

One thing that helps with the Apoxie stuff is to let it set up for 45 min to an hour before trying to use it. The Apoxie Fixit is extremely tacky - gotta let that stuff sit for an hour and even then it's still pretty tacky.
Gee_jays_Customs -
Thursday, March 22, 2007
I honestly recommend super sculpey...sculpey is too brittle when hardened and it doesn't stick well to plastic with my past experiences. Super sculpey works well...and as for sculpey 3, its like an upgraded version of SS. More wax like textured I believe, not too sure about S3 and never used it before....but SS would be a def. choice...^_^

~Gj
Henchmen4Hire -
Thursday, March 22, 2007
Uh, well the packages I got say Sculpey 3, I'm not sure what super sculpey is @_@
Buzzy Fret -
Thursday, March 22, 2007
I guess I need a little clarification here too are you talking about Sculpey or Super Sculpey? I've seen both. I picked up a small pack of regular white Sculpey to do some practicing with today.
Henchmen4Hire -
Thursday, March 22, 2007
If you heat it enough then yeah, Sculpey gets rock-hard, it's just that your figure will usually get damaged if you get it that hot, which is why a lower heat setting over a longer time is recommended. But maybe Sculpey HAS to get to that high teperature to cure rock-hard?...otherwise it's hard but you can damage it if you scratch hard enough.
Buzzy Fret -
Thursday, March 22, 2007
Does it get as hard as the Apoxie stuff? I have to admit the consistency and the tackiness of the apoxie give me a hard time.
Henchmen4Hire -
Saturday, March 17, 2007
Water slides right off the Sculpey, no mess at all! Just sculpt whatever you want and then dunk it in some really hot water. Note I said REALLY HOT water, NOT CONSTANTLY BOILING water. Get the water to boil, then lower the heat way down, then put the Sculpey in there.

If you sculpted something minor (like a belt or a thin mask) then hold it in there for like 5-10 minutes. If you used a thick layer of sculpey then I'd say boil it and use a hair-dryer too.
Bob-A-Ferret -
Saturday, March 17, 2007
Boiling sculpty does this work well. I always bake mine, I would have thought the sculpty would absorb the water and become more of a mess. But if boiling works well let me know how long I should boil it for?
Henchmen4Hire -
Saturday, March 17, 2007
Uh, well, the thing with Sculpey is that the thicker it is, the longer it's going to take to harden. You can sculpt with it normally, then when you're done hit it with the hair-dryer or boil it. I like the consistency of sculpey WAY more than the apoxie stuff!
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