Airbrushing info.
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Airbrushing info.

Posted in Custom Workstation

I now officially have my 2nd airbrush. The 1st one I got was a Paashe, now yeah its american made but its really around a $100 airbrush it sprays massive overspray which does for major clean up after words.

So in the last year I've spent hours or even days scouring the Iwata brochure for the proper brush. For almost 7 months I wanted the HP-BC Plus which is good and recommended and around $170. However in October I changed my mind and decided on the CMC plus. Its a $400 airbrush but perfect for fine line detail. Now the info on this talks about "complete atomization" of the paint. what does this mean? Well from what I can tell the paint is basically bonded to the object painted!

With the Paashe you simply take a Qtip and denatured alcohol and swab the overspray to remove it.

Well with the CMC plus (1) there is 1/10th of the overspray and thats because I am not adjusted to the fineline use of this and (2) What overspray there is MUST be repainted as once the paint dries its bonded to the figure and does not come off. That also explains why the paint is not rubbing of the joints as much also.

So in the long run is it worth shelling out tons of money for a top of the line Japanese airbrush the answer is yes! Just becareful as there are a ton of tiny parts when cleaning.

Posted by Mikey11935
on Thursday, January 17, 2008
User Comments
Mikey11935 -
Friday, January 18, 2008
Look doc, no sweat I had onea those airbrushes and I used it for over a year. I really did get tired of masking off pieces and it was easier to remove the paint with just a qtip & alcohol. It was really my choice to get the Benz of airbrushes. Iwata also make a $180 HPBC plus that is supposed to be really good also. I just wanted a complete fineline as I once had a friend that painted in this medium and he was AWESOME and yes I am very lucky to have a wife that supports me this much to by me the state of the art brush and for what I do yes I needed it badly.

Afterall it boils down to what you really need.
Henchmen4Hire -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
Lol...

Well, like I said, I paid 60 (80 with the compressor) for mine and it does everything you'd expect. It doesn't do super-fine lines but I just use a marker or a stencil for that anyway. It's the kind that shoots out more or less paint depending on how far back you pull the lever, no problems with it yet. The guys who have 3 airbrushes are the same kind of guys who buy 4 different paintball guns, you only need 1, maybe 2 to have a back-up, but they all do the same thing in slightly different ways.

You're lucky you got that airbrush though o_@
Mikey11935 -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
That's what I mean, a finer spray means more of the paint's surface area bonds with the figure so it should be a stronger bond (in theory) than using thicker coats, where the paint's surface area is being wasted.

Sounds good but I aint paying 400 bucks for an airbrush :P My 60 dollar one does a flawless job.

Ya gotta look at it like this the glass is half full! Besides in Japan this is over$800.
Besides it was a christmas gift anyway. Im just now getting used to it. I don't miss the overspray of the regular airbrushes for sure and I bought it so that I could consider doing canvas painting as well.
This is great for fine line.

And Doc you must consider what every airbrusher says: "you need a total of 3 airbrushes to choose from."

Besides if word of superior quality leaks out it is always possible that you ignite into a flaming ball and every figure you do sells for over a $100. (isnt that everyone's dream?)
Esbat -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
That's what I mean, a finer spray means more of the paint's surface area bonds with the figure so it should be a stronger bond (in theory) than using thicker coats, where the paint's surface area is being wasted.

Sounds good but I aint paying 400 bucks for an airbrush :P My 60 dollar one does a flawless job.

I use the Testor's can of air method of air brushing, because I thought that 55 bucks for the little black box one was too much
Henchmen4Hire -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
That's what I mean, a finer spray means more of the paint's surface area bonds with the figure so it should be a stronger bond (in theory) than using thicker coats, where the paint's surface area is being wasted.

Sounds good but I aint paying 400 bucks for an airbrush :P My 60 dollar one does a flawless job.
Mikey11935 -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
Fine disbeliever!
Buy one and be equally impressed for yourself!

I would not believe either were it not for the fact that I am using acrylics that Can be removed with denatured alcohol or paint thinner. But it does not. I have also moved the joints of conan several times and nothing happened.
Of course anything can happen with a lot of wear. But from where I stand its very impressive.
Supposedly atomization creates a tighter bond as the molecules are broken down into finer spray particles.

Hey its not like I understood the whole "complete atomization" propaganda in Iwatas press release until I tried to remove it by scrubbing with the mentioned removers to no avail. However the fresh paint not yet dried did remove somewhat.

Of course how many will actually invest $400 in a state of the art airbrush is also another matter.
Henchmen4Hire -
Thursday, January 17, 2008
Well, I don't know about more atomization meaning a permanent bond. I mean, if the paint is atomized completely then that's great because you get a smoother result, but paint is paint, you can still rub it off no matter how finely atomized it is. Maybe more of the paint touches the actual figure so it bonds better than if you were to brush it on, where the layer of paint is thicker, meaning less of it is touching the figure itself.
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