I've been thinking --
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I've been thinking --

Posted in Custom Workstation

In theory, could I make a mold of an entire figure, cast it, then go in and cut out all the separate parts at the joint lines with a Dremel, and re-articulate it? If so, how would I make the joints, aside from the screw or magnet methods?

Posted by harveytwoface999
on Friday, January 23, 2009
User Comments
atgscl -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
yeah, I guess you're right. Just be sure to check the silicon mold matrial to see if you can use it with those other materials.
harveytwoface999 -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
Just thought of something - the molds would also be useful for casting in other materials - e.g. the ones getting run over would be plaster, the ones getting melted would be candle wax, etc. I think it'd be worth it to get the trial sizes, make a few plastic pulls for the hero and stunt figures, and then cast in those other materials.
atgscl -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
oh, I thought you were making ball joints and stuff. Yeah, it could work but would require a lot of patience and it would cost a lot.
I was looking at the costs of mold making and casting supplies and just to get started with trial sizes it will cost no less than $75
Henchmen4Hire -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
Oh cool, you should be able to get away with minimal articulation then, just add a bunch of swivels whereever you can.
harveytwoface999 -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
Well the reason I'm making these figures is because I plan to make my own Action League Now shorts, and in keeping with the spirit of the show there'll be figures that are beaten around, tossed out of buildings, run over, etc. Those will be the "stunt" figures I'll use in wider shots, and if I'm gonna be beating the hell out of these toys, I figure I could keep casting "stunt" figures as opposed to using the "hero" figures (the ones that basically just have to look good in close-ups).
Henchmen4Hire -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
There's no way I see any sane person attempting this

What you could do is cast the entire figure, then sculpt-in any gaps from joints so it looks like a statue (like if the figure had articulated ankles, you'd have to sculpt on that area to make it look like a normal non-articulated ankle). Then you can cut that up and add very simple swivels to it.

That would make making copies of it easier too.

But I have to ask, is it really worth the hassle? What's so important that you want to do this?
harveytwoface999 -
Saturday, January 24, 2009
Hmm. I could see how things would go wrong. But atgscl - "disproportionate?" I'm not too clear on that, as what I was thinking of was if I was working on a casting of a figure that pretty much consisted of simple swivel joints (neck, shoulders, waist, etc) I could just make a cut in the gap between the two parts, hollow out space for a new swivel joint (a larger screw, magnets, or even put in a simple ball-and-socket joint or something), and put it together that way. Not too sure what you mean though, as the way I described it would most likely let it keep its proportions. (I'm only talking about swivel joints though - cutting out existing ball-and-socket joints, etc. would be too tricky.)
atgscl -
Friday, January 23, 2009
The figure would be disproportionate after the joints are added and it would be much harde than molding each part seperately
Punstarr -
Friday, January 23, 2009
You'd be better off molding each piece separately. Otherwise it'd be more trouble than it's worth.
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